How should you tip in Greece and what is the customary amount for different services such as restaurants, hotels, taxis, or guides?

Greece is a popular destination for travelers who want to enjoy its rich history, culture, cuisine and natural beauty. But when it comes to tipping in Greece, many visitors may be confused about the etiquette and expectations. Do you tip in Greece? How much should you tip? Who should you tip and when? In this blog post, we will answer these questions and provide some practical tips on how to tip in Greece without offending anyone or breaking the bank.

Do you tip in Greece?

The short answer is yes, but not always. Tipping in Greece is not expected or obligatory, as service workers are paid and insured. However, if you receive excellent service, you can leave a small amount of money as a gratuity to show your appreciation and satisfaction. Tipping is also a way of supporting the local economy, especially in times of crisis or low season.

However, tipping in Greece is not as common or standardized as in some other countries, such as the US or Canada. There is no set percentage or rule for tipping in Greece, and it may vary depending on the place, the occasion and the quality of service. Generally speaking, tipping in Greece is more of a personal choice than a social norm.

How much should you tip in Greece?

As a general guideline, you can tip around 10% of the bill in most cases. If you get exceptionally good service, you can tip up to 15% or 20%. However, there are some exceptions and variations depending on the type of service and the situation. Here are some specific tips for different services in Greece:


  • Restaurants and tavernas:

    If you have a meal at a restaurant or a taverna (a traditional Greek eatery), you can tip between 10% and 15% of the bill, or round it up to the nearest euro. For example, if your bill is 27 or 28 euros, you can leave 30 euros in total. If your bill is 35 euros, you can leave up to 40 euros in total, especially if you had great table service or some complimentary items. However, if you only have a snack or a drink at a restaurant or a taverna, you don’t need to tip at all.

  • Cafes and bars:

    If you have a coffee or a drink at a cafe or a bar, you can round up the bill to the nearest euro, or leave some coins in the tip jar by the till. For example, if your coffee costs 2.50 euros, you can pay 3 euros and leave the change. However, tipping at cafes and bars is not very common or expected in Greece.

  • Taxis:

    If you take a taxi in Greece, you can tip between 5% and 10% of the fare, or round it up to the nearest euro. For example, if your taxi ride costs 7 euros, you can pay 8 euros and leave the change. However, tipping taxi drivers is not mandatory in Greece.

  • Hotels:

    If you stay at a hotel in Greece, you can tip the staff who provide you with personal service, such as porters, bellhops, housekeepers or concierges. You can tip them between 1 and 5 euros per service, depending on the level of service and the size of your luggage or room. For example, you can tip a porter 1 euro per bag, a housekeeper 2 euros per day, or a concierge 5 euros for arranging a tour or a reservation. However, tipping hotel staff is not obligatory in Greece.

  • Tour guides:

    If you join a guided tour in Greece, you can tip your guide between 10% and 20% of the tour price, depending on the quality and duration of the tour. For example, if your tour costs 50 euros per person, you can tip your guide between 5 and 10 euros per person. However, tipping tour guides is not required in Greece.

Who should you tip and when?

In general, you should tip anyone who provides you with personal and exceptional service in Greece. However, there are some people who you don’t need to tip at all in Greece:


  • Service charge:

    Some restaurants and tavernas may include a service charge or a cover charge in your bill. This is not a tip, but a small fee that covers bread and non-bottled water, which are usually served for free. If you don’t want any bread or water, you can ask for this charge to be removed from your bill. Otherwise, it may appear on your bill as ΚΟΥΒΕΡ, which is the word COVER in Greek. You don’t need to tip on top of this charge, unless you want to.

  • Self-service:

    If you order or pay at the counter, or if you use a self-service machine or a vending machine, you don’t need to tip at all. This applies to fast-food restaurants, bakeries, kiosks, gas stations and other places where there is no table service or personal interaction.

  • Public services:

    You don’t need to tip anyone who works in the public sector, such as bus drivers, train conductors, museum staff, doctors, nurses, teachers or civil servants. Tipping them may be seen as rude or inappropriate.

How should you tip in Greece?

There are some tips on how to tip in Greece without causing any confusion or offense:


  • Tip in cash:

    The best way to tip in Greece is to tip in cash, preferably in euros. Tipping with foreign currency may be seen as disrespectful or inconvenient. Tipping with credit or debit cards is also not very common or practical in Greece, as some places may not accept cards or may not have a tipping option on their machines. If you tip with a card, the tip may not reach the person who served you, or it may be taxed by the government. Therefore, tipping with cash is always preferred and appreciated in Greece.

  • Tip directly:

    The best way to tip in Greece is to tip directly to the person who served you, rather than leaving the money on the table or at the till. This way, you can ensure that the tip goes to the right person and that they know that you are tipping them. You can also say thank you and compliment them on their service when you tip them. This will make them feel valued and respected.

  • Tip discreetly:

    The best way to tip in Greece is to tip discreetly and politely, rather than making a big deal out of it. Tipping is not a show-off or a competition in Greece, but a gesture of gratitude and generosity. Therefore, you should avoid tipping too much or too little, tipping in front of other customers or staff, or asking for change when you tip. You should also avoid tipping if you are unhappy with the service or if you have a complaint. In these cases, you can speak to the manager or the owner instead.

Conclusion

Tipping in Greece is not as complicated or stressful as it may seem. As long as you follow some basic guidelines and use your common sense and courtesy, you can tip in Greece without any problems. Tipping in Greece is not mandatory, but it is always appreciated and welcomed by the people who work hard to make your stay enjoyable and memorable. By tipping in Greece, you can show your respect and appreciation for the Greek culture and hospitality, and also support the local economy and community.

We hope that this blog post has helped you understand how to tip in Greece and what is the customary amount for different services. If you have any questions or comments about tipping in Greece, feel free to leave them below. We would love to hear from you!